IMO - INTERNATIONAL MARITIME ORGANIZATION

 

 

ZERO-EMISSION SHIPPING TARGETS 2030 - 2100

 

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THE IMO IS KEEN TO CLEAN UP OUR OCEANS, WITH TARGETS THAT ARE ACHIEVABLE, PROVIDED THAT THE SHIPPING INDUSTRY DEFINES WHAT ARE THE MOST PRACTICAL SOLUTIONS. PRACTICAL BEING COST EFFECTIVE AND SUSTAINABLE.

 

 

 

 

The IMO have introduced legally binding targets to clean up smoke from stacks of ships powered by high sulfur, heavy diesel oils, commonly called bunker fuels. The name derives from coal bunkers. Coal, being the first bunker fuel, a very dirty way to fire steam engines. But, it gave us reliable scheduled deliveries, that sailing ships could not always meet.

 

In 2018 historic targets were agreed within International Maritime Organization (IMO) to cut the total net global GHG emissions from international shipping:

 

- by at least 40% by 2030 compared to a 2008 benchmark

 

- by at least 50% by 2050, to reduce carbon intensity,

 

- and to completely (100%) decarbonise shipping by the end of the century; 2100.

At the time of such proposals, shipping accounted for around 2.5% of global GHG emissions and although ships are becoming more efficient, due to increasing global trade, this contribution is increasing. These emissions are more than any EU state and if the sector was a country, it would rank as the sixth highest in the world. In 2015, shipping accounted for 13% of overall EU greenhouse gas emissions from the transport sector.

Overwhelmingly, long distance shipping accounts for the majority of GHG emissions and its decarbonisation is particularly challenging. It is expected that solutions will need to combine a variety of technologies, operational practices, energy sources and efficiency measures.

 

Bunkering of renewable fuels is something that the Cleaner Ocean Foundation identified as the Achilles-Heel of international shipping many years ago. The move to Liquid Natural Gas (LNG) as a stop gap, did not really take off. And the goal posts have moved in any event, due to the International Maritime Organization's (IMO's) latest targets for 2030, 2040, 2050, and 100% zero emissions by 2100, as indicated above.

 

These targets may sound like along way off, but it is only around the corner, if the shipping industry is to transition. Where shipping involves significant investment over ten to twenty years of depreciation. And, the whole industry is profit driven - as are most businesses, so are not prone to rash decision making. In other words change is slow.

 

IMO HISTORY

The International Maritime Organization (IMO), known as the Inter-Governmental Maritime Consultative Organization (IMCO) until 1982, is a specialised agency of the United Nations responsible for regulating shipping. The IMO was established following agreement at a UN conference held in Geneva in 1948 and the IMO came into existence ten years later, meeting for the first time in 1959. Headquartered in London, United Kingdom, the IMO currently has 174 Member States and three Associate Members, hence the G20.

The IMO's primary purpose is to develop and maintain a comprehensive regulatory framework for shipping and its remit today includes safety, environmental concerns, legal matters, technical co-operation, maritime security and the efficiency of shipping. The latter is our main concern, as it affects global warming.

IMO is governed by an assembly of members and is financially administered by a council of members elected from the assembly. The work of IMO is conducted through five committees and these are supported by technical subcommittees. Other UN organisations may observe the proceedings of the IMO.

The IMO is supported by a permanent secretariat of employees who are representative of the organisation's members. The secretariat is composed of a Secretary-General who is periodically elected by the assembly, and various divisions such as those for marine safety, environmental protection and a conference section.

 

 

 

 

 

CONTACT IMO

International Maritime Organization
4, Albert Embankment
London
SE1 7SR
United Kingdom

Tel +44 (0)20 7735 7611
Fax +44 (0)20 7587 3210
Email: info@imo.org

 

 

 

 

 

Elizabeth Swann - Jules Verne - World Hydrogen Challenge

 

 

POSSIBLY THE WORLD'S FASTEST HYDROGEN YACHT - Unconventional projects from maverick eco entrepreneurs are most welcome as entries to the JVH2. Why not form your own racing team and help the world blaze a trail to zero emission shipping.

 

 

 

 

 

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